Speculative Fiction/YA Author

Addams Family Home For Sale

There were two VERY LUCKY little gray squirrels in our yard today! Richard went out to put the lawnmower away. The squirrels split and went in different directions and the next thing Richard knew a Red-Tailed Hawk flew out of our tree! Yeah no kidding! Close call! The last time a Hawk was in our neighborhood a lone Blue Jay chased it off.I shot this photo of a Hawk sitting in a tree.  It’s branches hung over the road. Luckily the Hawk didn’t poop on the car or at us as they have been known to do in the past.— Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area

There were two VERY LUCKY little gray squirrels in our yard today! Richard went out to put the lawnmower away. The squirrels split and went in different directions and the next thing Richard knew a Red-Tailed Hawk flew out of our tree! Yeah no kidding! Close call! The last time a Hawk was in our neighborhood a lone Blue Jay chased it off.

I shot this photo of a Hawk sitting in a tree.  It’s branches hung over the road. Luckily the Hawk didn’t poop on the car or at us as they have been known to do in the past.— Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area

vikingsgonnapillage:

Shetland’s Viking Fire Festival 

WOW!!

Toadstools and moss that I photographed today
rhamphotheca:

Absurd Creature of the Week:  Carnivorous Harp Sponge
by Matt Simon
If you were a sea creature and you wanted to form a band, you’d have some tough decisions to make. Who should take vocals: dolphins or whales? And what about the drums? Presumably it’d be some sort of cephalopod, what with all those arms, but would it play on giant clams or brain corals? And good luck finding stringed instruments, unless you want to risk anaphylactic shock and strum some jellyfish.
But if you can manage it, plunge to around 10,000 feet deep and you’ll find your strings anchored right to the seafloor. This is the 3-foot-wide harp sponge, and there’s nothing quite like it on the planet. It’s hardly even a sponge as we would recognize it, having left behind the filter-feeding lifestyle and become a carnivore, passively nabbing tiny critters unlucky enough to float through its strings. Think SpongeBob SquarePants, only without the pants and with way more murder.
The remarkable image above is from 2012 when scientists, including marine biologist Henry Reiswig of British Columbia’s University of Victoria, collected two specimens and observed 10 more off the California coast using two remotely operated vehicles from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. At such depths, though, collecting good specimens is exceedingly difficult because it can take hours to return to the surface…
(read more: Wired Science)
image: MBARI

rhamphotheca:

Absurd Creature of the Week:  Carnivorous Harp Sponge

by Matt Simon

If you were a sea creature and you wanted to form a band, you’d have some tough decisions to make. Who should take vocals: dolphins or whales? And what about the drums? Presumably it’d be some sort of cephalopod, what with all those arms, but would it play on giant clams or brain corals? And good luck finding stringed instruments, unless you want to risk anaphylactic shock and strum some jellyfish.

But if you can manage it, plunge to around 10,000 feet deep and you’ll find your strings anchored right to the seafloor. This is the 3-foot-wide harp sponge, and there’s nothing quite like it on the planet. It’s hardly even a sponge as we would recognize it, having left behind the filter-feeding lifestyle and become a carnivore, passively nabbing tiny critters unlucky enough to float through its strings. Think SpongeBob SquarePants, only without the pants and with way more murder.

The remarkable image above is from 2012 when scientists, including marine biologist Henry Reiswig of British Columbia’s University of Victoria, collected two specimens and observed 10 more off the California coast using two remotely operated vehicles from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. At such depths, though, collecting good specimens is exceedingly difficult because it can take hours to return to the surface…

(read more: Wired Science)

image: MBARI


An interesting medical condition that I ran across in my reading today- Word Blindness.